Sunday, March 15, 2020

Miss Havisham first impression Essay Example

Miss Havisham first impression Essay Example Miss Havisham first impression Paper Miss Havisham first impression Paper Essay Topic: Literature One of the main characters of Charles Dickens novel Great Expectations is Miss Havisham. Throughout the course of the novel, we discover lots about her and her life, especially in the first part of chapter 8 in the story. The main thing we discover about Miss Havisham, is that 20 years ago she was unfortunately jilted at the alter, and this has greatly affected her ever since. In this essay, I am going to discuss and explain the ways in which Dickens clever shapes the readers opinion of Miss Havisham, and the views we have on her because of this. The main way I believe that Dickens shapes the readers first impression of Miss Havisham, is by writing about her description through the eyes of Pip. Pip is the main character in the novel, and we learn from earlier that he is from an extremely poor background, and as he is naive and from an age where he is easily influenced by what is around him, especially because of his dream to be a gentleman. Being from such a poor family, as Pip enters Miss Havishams house everything appears even more elegant and expensive that is really is, as he has never seen objects like this before. When Pip explains the room Miss Havisham lives in, we get the impression that Miss Havisham has become a hermit since she was left by her husband to be. She appears to have absolutely no life as nothing appears to have changed in the room since that day, for example, she is still wearing her white wedding dress, which has turned to a rotten yellow due to the length of time she has been wearing it. Because of this, we get the impression she has turned crazy, as she has not changed her clothes for 20 years. We can tell from the way Pip behaves towards Miss Havisham, and her adopted daughter Estella, that Pip believes the way he and Miss Havisham get along could result in his family getting a sum of money from Miss Havisham, and this is extremely important to his sister, who is his guardian. There is proof of this in the novel when Miss Havisham asks Pip if he is afraid of her, and instead of saying yes, he replies that I am afraid of not pleasing you. However, we get the impression that later on he becomes afraid rather than nervous, as he starts to realise that there is something not quite right about her and the way she talks to him. We can tell he feels scared from the way Pip interacts with her and the way he responds to her questions, with lots of pauses, and using broken dialogue, as thought he is terrified to say the wrong thing. The way Pip describes the different objects in the room gives us an impression of what Miss Havishams life is like. The room is filled with rich and expensive objects such as dressing tables and looking glasses lit with candles. He talks about these objects as though he has never heard of or even seen anything like them before. He talks about a draped table with a gilded looking glass, giving the impression he thinks of these thing as elegant and special, and yet Miss Havisham appears to take little care of the things in the room. He describes what she is wearing as rich materials satins, lace, and silks all of white. This gives us the impression she is glamorous and clean looking, whereas we later learn her white clothes have turned yellow from not being washed in 20 years, as Pip says I learn that everything in my view ought to be white, and was white long ago. The room is filled with dirt and everything surrounding her is old and no longer elegant and rich looking as Pip first made out. We then get the impression Miss Havisham is unhealthy, unfed and unclean, from Pips description of how she looks. We understand that she is withered like her dress, this use of simile shows that she has shrunk to skin and bone, and has bright, however sunken eyes. The author then compares Miss Havisham to a ghastly waxwork, and even worse a skeleton. Dickens then goes on to describe Pips fear by stating that I should have cried out, if I could. There is a strong contrast in the novel between white and yellow, it is often mentioned that everything surrounding Miss Havisham used to be white and fresh, but is dirty and yellow. This appears to be comparing colours to Miss Havishams life, where she used to be young and youthful before she was jilted, but has now grown old and ill looking, The fact that Dickens has chosen to describe Miss Havishams surroundings prove to us how important it is to Dickens that we can understand Miss Havishams distress and depression. Dickens uses repetition throughout the novel to show the repetition in Miss Havishams life and how everything is always the same. In conclusion, I believe that seeing as marriage was so important to women in the early 1900s due to the fact they felt as though they needed a man in their lives for financial and emotional security, this is the reason Miss Havisham is like this and Pip, being young and naive did not at all understand why she had turned so crazy and into a hermit, which is the reason Dickens chose to describe Miss Havisham through Pips eyes. Altogether, I believe the way that Dickens has written the novel gives us a view on the rich (Miss Havisham) and the poor (Pip) as he sees them. Money can turn you mad, and is definitely not everything.

Friday, February 28, 2020

Physician-Assisted Suicide for Alzheimer Patients Article

Physician-Assisted Suicide for Alzheimer Patients - Article Example There are alternatives to physician-assisted suicide for Alzheimer patients and dementia victims. One of them is palliative care. However, some opinion polls indicate support for PAS when it is administered only as a relief for a dying patient under extreme pain. Besides, Americans prefer an alternative such as ensuring control of pain and offering compassionate care for such Alzheimer patients, not helping them to die (Rhymes et al). Moreover, this preference is firmer among the patients of Alzheimer. A past study found out that numerous patients under pain preferred palliative care to PAS more than the public who also support palliative care. Masses still prefer pain relief and palliative care more than euthanasia or PAS though the latter method is not as popular as the PAS. This is because PAS underplays proper pain management practices. This therefore disputes Jack Kevorkian’s suicide assisted demise (Knickerbocker, 2011). Secondly, hospice care is yet another option for patients with Alzheimer ailment. This is a method that has increasingly been seen as an end of life choice for individuals with this deadly disease. Furthermore, this alternative applies activities such as pet therapy which offers reassurance and compassionate care for them. Additionally, the patients can be read to or listen to music, which is believed to elicit long forgotten emotion, regardless of the fact that they may not be apt to communicate effectively. However, some aspects of hospice care may seem not to effectively help patients with serious dementia (Rhymes et al). For instance, counseling at the end of life may not be effectual for those patients with communication drawbacks. Thirdly, patients with Alzheimer disease may make a decision to undergo pain control procedures disputed to the renowned PAS that Jack Kevorkian endorses as the best method of helping Alzheimer patients. Besides, pain is underrated and difficult to reduce in Alzheimer patients under dementia. Therefore, pain control aims at; at least reducing the pain than terminating it through PAS.

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Bio Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Bio - Assignment Example ADP is made up of two phosphate molecules while AMP is made up of a single phosphate molecule. Combination of two molecules of results in the production of AMP. As shown here 2ADP→ATP + AMP viii. Coenzymes refers to specific organic compounds that must be present for certain enzymes to do catalysis process e.g. nicotine adenine dinucleotide. Cofactor are specific organic compounds that are only requited to change the rate of catalysis i.e. to increase the rate of catalysis. Step 1 - In the first step, there is conversion of glucose to fructo-1, 6-biophosphate using ATP. At the same time, there is trapping of glucose inside the cell which is then converted to an unstable form that can easily be cleaved to 3 – carbon units. The formed fructo-1, 6-biophosphateis then cleaved into glycerladehyde-3-phosphate. x. Organisms respire without oxygen through incomplete breakdown of glucose in the absence of Oxygen. There causes a reduced oxidation of NADH to NAD+ and the process of glycolysis become ineffective. Instead, reduction of pyruvate to lactate generates NAD+, leading to production of only two ATPs of energy. i. Autotrophs are organisms that use inorganic materials and basic energy sources to manufacture organic molecules that contain energy. A prime example is plants. Plants use oxygen and sunlight to manufacture food through the process of photosynthesis. xi. The reaction centre is the site on which chemical reactions take place. It is a complex of numerous pigments, proteins and other co-factors that act together to perform the main energy conversin reaction processes of photosynthesis. xiii. Photosystem 2 appears before and produces ATP while photosystem 1 occurs after Photosystem 2 and it produces NADPH. Photosystem 1 is more sensitive to 700 nm of light wavelengths while photosystem 2 is sensitive to 680 nm of light wavelengths. xxi. The type of reactions used in the Calvin cycle are fixation of Carbon dioxide into RuBP

Friday, January 31, 2020

Security and idententy Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Security and idententy - Essay Example In the modern society, security does not refer to the state as a government or a territorial entity, but relatively as a collective identity of the nation. This indicates that, security in a society may be compromised by anything that compromises their identity (Panic 30). On the other hand, societal security relates to the capability of a society to preserve its essential characteristics in the face of variable circumstances despite of the potential and actual threats. In this case, security is compromised when a community perceives a threat as a hazard to its identity since identity is defined as a set of ideas and practices that recognize particular individuals as members of a social group (Panic 30). Moreover, nations are imaginary communities and national identities, which are the most important references object of the societal security. National identity, therefore, involves some forms of political community, common institutions and one code of duties and rights for all member s of the community. This identity also suggests a definite social space and demarcated territories, which are easily identified by members of the community (Panic 31). This means that community members have a feeling of belonging into this identity. This will, therefore, give a clear definition of a state as a group of people obeying similar rules and institutions within a given territory. According to David Campbell, there are two conceptions of a nation, which includes the civil model and ethics (Campbell 24). These are two predominantly conceptual territories, which need to be protected by the nation. This is due to the fact that nations have to possess compact, well-defined territories. Campbell indicates that territories cannot be just anywhere but must be... It is clear that security and identity have a deeper meaning rather than protecting the affairs of a country since, after the Cold War that appeared in European countries in early 1940s, there emerged new and complex security models of states and individuals. These new approaches were considerably divergent compared to traditional, narrow concepts since they indicate that something can be a security issue despite having no threat to the state. Different from traditional phenomena, other factors such as migrations and cultural identity challenges can contribute to identity securitization in a country. The identity of social group is the object of societal security concept. Social security is thus something concerning individuals and its nature in the prevailing economy. On the other hand, societal security relates to the collectivity of identities and actions undertaken with the aim of protecting such identities in a country.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Healthcare and the Competitive Market Structure Essay -- Health Insura

A competitive market is one that allows easy entry and exit: a market in which companies are generally free to enter or to leave at will. This does not describe the health care market in the US. There are certain assumptions that the competitive market model operates under some assumptions, first is the consumer/patient has full information about the nature of the services required, the anticipated results of their decision and the benefits obtain from the service. This is not true in health care often time the patient is operating at a distinct information disadvantage when they require health care services such as insurance. If a patient purchases health insurance often they don’t know enough information to ascertain if they have purchased a quality plan. Second, consumers/patient and providers (physician, health insurance) act independently. This does not happen in health care because of the asymmetry of information that exists; patients must depend on the decisions made by their doctor or health care provider who is acting on their behalf as a health agent or gatekeeper. Sometimes physicians own diagnostic facilities or invest in health care organizations this affects their ability to be impartial. Third consumers bear the financial impact of their decision and are aware of price differences; most patients are insulated from the true cost of health care because of a third-party payer who bears the financial brunt of the decision to receive medical care. Shi and Singh state that even if a patient wanted to find out the cost of services sometimes it is difficult because of item based pricing. Fourth there is unrestrained competition regarding price and quality among providers. Access to the health care market unrestricted is b... .... Looking back to look forward: health care reform:. Retrieved December 16, 2010, from KPLU News Web site: http://www.kplu.org/health_care_script.html Federal Trade Commission, & Department of Justice. (2004). Improving health care: a dose of competition. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Haft, H. (n.d.). Is health care a right or a privilege? - health policy. Retrieved December 17, 2010, from BNET Web site: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0843/is_1_29/ai_96500897/ Shi, L., & Singh, D. A. (2008). Delivering health care in America a system approach (4th ed.). Sudbury, MA: Bartlett and Jones. United Nations. (1976, January 3). International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Retrieved December 17, 2010, from Office of the United Nations Commissioner for Human Rights Web site: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/law/cescr.htm Healthcare and the Competitive Market Structure Essay -- Health Insura A competitive market is one that allows easy entry and exit: a market in which companies are generally free to enter or to leave at will. This does not describe the health care market in the US. There are certain assumptions that the competitive market model operates under some assumptions, first is the consumer/patient has full information about the nature of the services required, the anticipated results of their decision and the benefits obtain from the service. This is not true in health care often time the patient is operating at a distinct information disadvantage when they require health care services such as insurance. If a patient purchases health insurance often they don’t know enough information to ascertain if they have purchased a quality plan. Second, consumers/patient and providers (physician, health insurance) act independently. This does not happen in health care because of the asymmetry of information that exists; patients must depend on the decisions made by their doctor or health care provider who is acting on their behalf as a health agent or gatekeeper. Sometimes physicians own diagnostic facilities or invest in health care organizations this affects their ability to be impartial. Third consumers bear the financial impact of their decision and are aware of price differences; most patients are insulated from the true cost of health care because of a third-party payer who bears the financial brunt of the decision to receive medical care. Shi and Singh state that even if a patient wanted to find out the cost of services sometimes it is difficult because of item based pricing. Fourth there is unrestrained competition regarding price and quality among providers. Access to the health care market unrestricted is b... .... Looking back to look forward: health care reform:. Retrieved December 16, 2010, from KPLU News Web site: http://www.kplu.org/health_care_script.html Federal Trade Commission, & Department of Justice. (2004). Improving health care: a dose of competition. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Haft, H. (n.d.). Is health care a right or a privilege? - health policy. Retrieved December 17, 2010, from BNET Web site: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0843/is_1_29/ai_96500897/ Shi, L., & Singh, D. A. (2008). Delivering health care in America a system approach (4th ed.). Sudbury, MA: Bartlett and Jones. United Nations. (1976, January 3). International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Retrieved December 17, 2010, from Office of the United Nations Commissioner for Human Rights Web site: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/law/cescr.htm

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Food Insecurities Essay

Have you ever seen a person yell at his colleague or his partner, overreacting on a particular matter that has caused not only the person who got yelled at to feel annoyed, but also third parties who know about it or have witnessed the scene? For the many who do not wish to get into the mess, or has enough logic sense to not judge immediately, they will most likely give out a fair statement and try to reason out that person’s overreaction by saying he probably had a bad day or he probably has dilemma at home. However, if we take a bit closer and look closely, all of us will eventually realise that it all goes down to one matter; insecurity. Insecurities are not something new and unfamiliar to the human kind. Everyone has insecurities, regardless of whether they realise it or not. The Oxford Dictionary defines insecurity as the uncertainty or anxiety about oneself or lack of confidence. Insecurities exist in every living soul on this planet. Till today, it is still seen as a negative matter as not many have addressed this issue in proper ways using proper mediums. Most parents don’t even talk about it and shove it away when their children decide to speak up about it. Little do people know that the slightest things in life are the ones that add up to our insecurities. The amount of insecurity in a person differs from one to the other. The types of insecurities that one possesses also vary. The most common type of insecurity is physical insecurity. Let’s face it; human beings are never satisfied. Even when you have all the parts of the body needed to sustain and go through your daily routine with ease, you still beg for more. Some want healthier and shiner hair, some want to be taller, but most importantly, everyone wants something. It is not just human beings as an individual who face insecurities, but also countries and states. Currently, the world is looking at the issue of food insecurity, which is also classified as a type of insecurity. Food security may be said as the availability of food and one’s access to it. Hence, the United Nations have defined food security as all people at all times having both physical and economic access to the basic food they need. For more than 2 billion of people on this planet, they are lucky to not worry about this form of insecurity. However, we might not realise this but this matter is more complicated than it seems. Food securities may result from many different causes. It is imperative that we focus on why are the food insecure, and why are the people are food insecure. Among the most common causes of food insecurities are drought and extreme weather changes. This setback, which is very commonly faced by third world countries, usually ranges from overnight floods to droughts. In short, the climate changes faced by these countries are extreme. In most African countries, like Nigeria, droughts are not new to them. It has been a setback since the time of their ancestors; nonetheless, they are helpless at it and have no comeback on solving this matter. In many comparisons throughout time, some of the most severe food crises were all preceded by drought or by other similarly extreme weather events. These extremities result in poor and failed harvests which in turn results food scarcity and high prices of the available food. As mentioned in the Climate and Development Knowledge Network report entitled ‘Managing Climate Extremes and Disasters in the Agriculture Sectors: Lessons from the IPCC SREX Report’, such force of nature causes impacts which will include not only food insecurity, but changing productivity and livelihood patterns, economic losses, and impacts on the infrastructure. Besides that, the natural resource base for the poor and food-insecure is invariably narrow and, in many areas, fragile. With the exception of Uganda only 4 to 10 percent of the land area is classed as arable, and just a small area of land suitable for rainfed cultivation. The greatest numbers of poor people are concentrated in the arid and semi-arid ecosystems and on marginal land in the higher rainfall parts of the region. It has become axiomatic to say that poverty is one of the main causes of environmental degradation. This can be seen all too clearly in the farming of steep slopes, which takes place as an increasing population is forced to cultivate marginal land. The falling crop yields that characterize the marginal areas are a result of the loss of massive quantities of topsoil throughout the region, declining soil fertility as fallow systems are replaced by continuous cultivation, reductions in soil organic matter as manure is burnt for fuel, and shrinking holding sizes. However, the poor are also the most vulnerable to environmental degradation because they depend on he exploitation of common property resources for a greater share of their incomes than richer households do. In the rangelands, the evidence for long-term secular environmental degradation is ambiguous. The successive cyclical growth and decline of herds reflects cycles of rainfall and rangeland productivity, and is perfectly normal. As animals die in large numbers, the rangelands recover remarkably quickly. However, when there i s a major drop in the number of animals, the people who depend on them for their livelihoods also suffer. Development programmes that have sought to increase animal production on rangelands through water development and animal disease prevention have all too often failed to find, at the same time, sustainable ways of increasing animal nutrition, so the resulting increased numbers of animals may wreak havoc on the range itself. Many of the available freshwater resources are in river basins and lakes that extend beyond the boundaries of individual nations. Shared water resources include lakes Victoria, Albert, Edward, Kivu and Turkana and major rivers such as the Blue Nile, White Nile, Atbara, Awash and Shebele. The potential for developing irrigation from these sources is constrained by the problem of achieving agreement on sharing the resources and avoiding conflict. Although natural climatic factors have played their part in the process of desertification, in general, it is increased population and the related development of unsustainable production systems that have had most negative impact on the fragile natural resource base. Wood and manure have remained the main sources of domestic energy, even in urban centres. This situation has contributed to depleting the forest and range resources, resulting in an overall decrease in biomass and biodiversity, reduced water infiltration and increased runoff and soil erosion. These factors, which contribute to the impoverishment of ecosystems, have led to a vicious circle of environmental degradation, lower system resilience to erratic rainfall, decreased agricultural productivity and increased poverty and food insecurity. Not only that, the cause of food insecurity in these third world countries are also caused by the poor state of development and maintenance of roads and transport, energy sources and telecommunications in the marginal areas of countries in the Horn of Africa makes it difficult for these areas to become integrated into the national and regional economy. As with all other indicators of development, the countries of the region have some of the worst figures worldwide with respect to access to roads and water supply. A recent report suggests that, in terms of access to infrastructure, the gap between Africa and the rest of the world has widened over the past 15 years. The sparse road and communications network hampers emergency relief operations as well as the commercialization of the rural economy. The density of the road network in the countries of the region gives an idea of both how difficult it is to reach people in rural areas with services and the problems such people face in participating in the market economy. For example, in Ethiopia, every kilometre of road serves 72 km 2 and 3 000 people, compared with only 8 km 2 and 850 people in North Africa. Even after strenuous efforts by development agencies and NGOs, access to a clean water supply is still an unobtainable luxury for most rural inhabitants in the Horn. Piped systems are uncommon in rural areas and protected wells and hand pumps are the best that rural communities can expect. The burden of collecting water, as with so many other menial tasks, falls almost exclusively on women in the communities, who must spend many hours each day collecting water from unsafe sources. The statistics on access to water and sanitation reveal wide differences within the region. In three countries, namely Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia, only one-quarter of the population has access to safe water, and in two others (the Sudan and Uganda) the figure is less than 50 percent. Access to sanitation is as low as 13 percent and, except for Kenya, barely exceeds 50 percent anywhere. In addition to that, the indicators of access to social services in the countries that face the setback of food insecurity are also among the lowest in the world. While the average figures are bad enough, they mask fundamental inequalities in access to services within the region. Again, rural areas, especially remote, low-potential areas are the least well served. Nomadic and semi-nomadic pastoralists are the most difficult populations to provide services to and, consequently, they are invariably the ones with the poorest health services and least education. All these indicators, combined with malnutrition and poor access to safe water, have adverse consequences for productivity and for the long-term physical and cognitive development of people in the region. Also, let us not forget the fact that crop and plants as well face diseases. Diseases affecting livestock or crops can have devastating effects on food availability especially if there are no emergency back-up plans in place. For example, an epidemic of stem rust on wheat which was spreading across Africa and into Asia in 2007 caused major concern. A virulent wheat disease could destroy most of the world’s main wheat crops, leaving millions to starve. The fungus had spread from Africa to Iran and may already be in Pakistan. A different threat, on the other hand, has attacked the African continent’s second biggest crop; wheat. In 1999, 50 years since the last outbreak, a contemporary and virulent strain of stem rust attacked the Ugandan crops. Its spores then travelled to Ethiopia and Kenya, before appearing in Iran last year. The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nation (FAO) has given warning to six other countries in the Central and South Asia to be prepared and keep an eye for symptoms of this new strain while scientists in the United States of America are working diligently in searching for a resistant that combats this problem. It is important that the remedy for this will be obtained quickly as in India alone; more than 50 million small-scale farmers are at risk because they depend on wheat for their food and earnings. Most importantly, we must not overlook that politics and dictatorship also play a role in food insecurity. Many do not realise that politics play a part in something as serious as this. As mentioned by Nobel Prize-winning economist Amarya Sen, â€Å"There is no such thing as an apolitical food problem. It is more often than not that the administration of the country that determines its severity, or even whether the famine will occur. If truth be told, the 20th century is full of examples of governments undermining the food security of their own nations. Let us take a look at Nigeria, Africa’s most densely inhabited state, where a legacy of corrupted governance and an economy based primarily on oil exports has left the agriculture sector significantly undermined, leaving millions of N igerians in deep hunger. True, the neighbouring countries export food to Nigeria in exchange for money, but remember; the people in these neighbouring countries need food too. And they are much poorer than those living in Nigeria. It was reported by the United Nations that thousands of children in countries neighbouring Nigeria died because of malnutrition. These kids paid the price not because of food shortage in their country, but because of food shortage in Nigeria. The distribution of food is often a political issue in most countries. The government will always give priority to urban areas and cities, since most influential and powerful families and enterprises are located there. The ruling government over and over again for generations overlooks the subsistence farmers and rural areas in general. In other words, the more rural an area, the less likely the government will pay attention to solving its needs. What’s more is that the governments of these countries would normally keep the price of basic grain at extremely low levels that subsistence farmers cannot accumulate sufficient capital to make investments to improve their production. Hence, they are prevented from getting out of their precarious situation. In addition, food has always been a political arsenal by the dictators and warlords, where they reward their supporters and deny food supplies to those areas that are against them. Under this condition, food has become more like a currency instead of a basic need that cannot be denied rights of. Food has become the money to buy support and used against the opposition. Even in Guatemala, income inequality is amongst the worst in the world, with indigenous communities at a disadvantage. In some areas, an estimated 75 percent of the children, ranging from infants to children ages six and seven years old, are severely malnourished. And this is a shocking statistic relating food scarcity coming from a country that is merely a four-hour flight away from the USA. Furthermore, it was pointed out in William Bernstein’s 2004 publication entitled ‘The Birth of Plenty’ that individuals without property will lead to starvation and it is much easier to bend the fearful and the hungry to the will of the state. If a farmer’s property can be arbitrarily threatened by the state, that power will inevitably be used to intimidate those with different political and religious opinions. It is fundamental and crucial that we understand and be aware of the consequences of this global food scarcity. The effects might be similar to the effects of malnutrition and hunger, where, at the outset, the human population will be affected greatly in the sense where stunted growth may occur. The stunting starts in when the baby is still in the mother’s womb and happens till the age of three. Once stunting happens, giving proper nutrition to these helpless children will not help in reversing the damage or improving the child’s condition. Pregnant mothers who do not receive the correct amount of nutrition needed may risk of having a higher chance of infant and child mortality later on, which is, of course, a very heartbreaking circumstance. Apart from that, severe malnutrition during one’s early childhood also leads to defects in cognitive development. Stunted individuals also have a higher chance of getting diseases and illnesses as compared to those who have not experienced stunting. It must also come to the attention that food insecurity is also associated with various developmental consequences for children in the United States. A research was conducted by Diana F. Jyoti, Edward A. Frongillo, and Sonya J. Jones to prove that food insecurity is linked to specific developmental consequences for children, and whether these consequences may be both nutritional and nonnutritional.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Lack Of A Marriage For Children - 797 Words

Amber Fortenberry Desiree Swain Composition II 10 February 2015 Lacking Love Many families try to mask and conceal any problems that may be arising throughout their marriage. Many spouses stay together for either the children, or the convenience. A marriage that is lacking in love is a disaster waiting to happen. If the love and respect is gone out of a marriage, and there is no way of fixing it, then end it. People think that staying in a marriage for the children benefits the children. In all reality, it does not. No child wants to walk on egg shells every day from the tension between their mother and father. How is your marriage when you think no one is watching? Would you be ashamed of your marriage if it were witnessed, or would it†¦show more content†¦For instance, if a marriage is falling apart behind closed doors, they might act like everything is perfect in front of their family. Especially their parents, or in-laws. No one wants to let down their parents. Back at home though, these actions more than likely will diminish, and the hatred and misery resurface. Just as Mr. and Mrs. Weed did. Shady Hill seems like a town where divorce is frowned upon. In a marriage, being who you would be by yourself and being who you are with your significant other should match up. When you and your spouse are alone, and you catch yourself being in a foul mood, you may show more signs of aggravation than normally, but when someone comes around, you and your spouse may try and cover your frustration, and pretend that nothing is wrong. Like you two have the perfect marriage. One in two first marriages in the United States end in divorce, and almost two out of three second marriages meet the same fate. (French). Despite common belief, men do not necessarily fall out of love because a woman puts on thirty pounds and becomes physically unattracted, or because of fights about money, or because one’s partner’s sexual needs are greater than other’s. These issues are just trip wires. (French). There are many stupid things that people do to mess up their relationships, but in Dr. Laura Schlessinger’s â€Å"10 Stupid Things Couples Do to Mess up Their Relationships† she points out ten. Stupid